Saturday, February 25, 2012

Tomorrow's Sun by Becky Melby

Synopsis from Goodreads.com :

Emily Foster won't allow herself to move on until she earns enough money to make restitution for the accident that stole a young girl's dreams. Flipping houses sounds like the fast track to her goal, but when her first project turns out to be a stop on the Underground Railroad, Emily finds herself drawn to, but at odds with, the contractor she hires. Jake Braden needs to focus on gaining guardianship of his late sister's twins, but the story of lost love uncovered in Emily's house sets the stage for what might become his own lost love.

Review :

One lived in the 19th century, the other live in current 21st century. Both found love and both encountered slavery in the very same house but hundreds of years apart. While the love they found is the same, the slavery they encountered is different yet similar. One witnessed the slavery of human being and together with her father and the man that she loved, they helped slaves to escape to live a life of freedom. The other is a slave to an accident that she can’t forgive herself for and the consequences of that accident that she can’t accept and the need to just escape, physically from her pain and sorrow of her hearts.

The only thing that connects Hannah Shaw and Emily Foster are the letters that was left behind by Hannah  hundreds of years ago. Then there was the secret room that Emily discovered in her new house and some items that was found together with the letters. Through these, connections were made that stretched beyond time and also among those in current times.

I enjoy this book although it was a very slow start. I also can't stand how the author dramatized what Emily went through but not telling the readers what it was. I enjoyed the historical mentioned of the Underground Railroad and the people who risked their lives to make it possible for others to live freely.

Tomorrow’s Sun is the first book in the Lost Sanctuary Series by Becky Melby. It is published by Barbour Publishing. I review this for netgalley.com

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