Monday, February 3, 2014

The Summons by John Grisham

Synopsis :

Ray Atlee is a professor of law at the University of Virginia. He's forty-three, newly single, and still enduring the aftershocks of a surprise divorce. He has a younger brother, Forrest, who redefines the notion of a family's black sheep.

And he has a father, a very sick old man who lives alone in the ancestral home in Clanton, Mississippi. He is known to all as Judge Atlee, a beloved and powerful official who has towered over local law and politics for forty years. No longer on the bench, the Judge has withdrawn to the Atlee mansion and become a recluse.


With the end in sight, Judge Atlee issues a summons for both sons to return home to Clanton, to discuss the details of his estate. It is typed by the Judge himself, on his handsome old stationery, and gives the date and time for Ray and Forrest to appear in his study.


Ray reluctantly heads south, to his hometown, to the place where he grew up, which he prefers now to avoid. But the family meeting does not take place. The Judge dies too soon, and in doing so leaves behind a shocking secret known only to Ray.


And perhaps someone else.


I loved John Grisham.  You would know that from here but what I discover is that John Grisham of old is slightly different for what he writes nowadays.  It is rather difficult to place the fingers on the pulse on the differences but if you are familiar with his work, you would know what I mean.

When I get hold of The Summon, I was hoping to find the John Grisham of old. And find him I did but a mere shadow only but better shadow than nothing at all I guess.  Having said that, there is a twist in the ending that made reading The Summon rather worth it.


Roy Atlee is the main character.  For some reason he reminded me of another of John Grisham's character, Kyle McAvoy from The Associate.  He is the down to earth, the 'good' son that does everything right and does all that he's supposed to do.  Whereas his brother, Forrest is the black sheep of the family.  But at the end of the book, who is the protagonist and who is the antagonist is very much debatable.

Go and get your copy and let me know if you agree with me.

1 comment:

  1. Book Review Request

    New Psychological Thriller Explores Relationships Between Main Characters

    Terror at Mirror Lake

    If you think Hannibal Lecter was evil, wait until you meet Luke Downing, a killer so evil he makes Lecter look like an altar boy.

    Terror lurks in the shadows of Mirror Lake, where secrets of sex, lies, and death are all patiently waiting to surface from its murky depths. The small town of Hamptonville seems the last place you would find sadistic sex, drugs, blackmail, and murder. But that’s exactly what Bruce Orum, his girlfriend Cindy Garvey, and two married couples encounter when they meet Luke Downing, a psychopath who takes pleasure by inflicting pain on his victims. At Mirror Lake Downing takes the two married couples prisoner and plans to torture and humiliate them before killing them. But he does not know that Sheriff Jeff Parker and his partner Molly Hutchison are on his trail and determined to stop him. From page one all the way to the breathtaking ending, you will find yourself on pins and needles waiting to see what happens next.

    Terror at Mirror Lake is more than just another psychological thriller. In its pages the author describes the causes of Luke Downing’s evil nature, his relationships with others, and the relationships between the two married couples he plans to torment and kill.

    Readers may download this exciting new novel by author Hank Kellner at AMAZON and at the Smashwords website, http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/309191

    About the Author: Hank Kellner is a retired associate professor of English. He is the author of 125 Photos for English Composition Classes (J. Weston Walch, 1978), How to Be a Better Photographer (J. Weston Walch, 1980), Write What You See (Prufrock Press, 2010), and, with Elizabeth Guy Reflect and Write: 300 Poems and Photographs to Inspire Writing Prufrock Press, 2013). His other writings and photographs have appeared in hundreds of publications nationwide.

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